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Archive for the ‘women of color’ Category

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I’ve been traveling and I like to take some junk food reading along when I fly. I found out about this (site is in French) in Marie Claire magazine.

Here’s the intro to the photo spread in the magazine:

French photographer JR has spent the past year taking portraits of victimized women in Africa, Asia and South America, then making massive, poster-size prints which he plasters illegally in places you’d least expect – on buildings, bridges, buses, and beyond. The idea, says JR, who doesn’t give his full name in case he’s prosecuted, is to celebrate the strength and courage of women who live in places where they are often targets in wartime – and discriminated against in times of peace.

As mentioned above, the text on the artist’s website is in French, but there is a video explaining the project which is in English. The photos are stunning. I would love to know what the reaction is of people in the towns where the photos are displayed, and what happens to the women. (As Ms. Cripchick points out in the comments, there is an English version of the site.)

The photo below is from Liberia.

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Tell It WOC Speak

Read it here.

This carnival is our attempt to give voice to our shared issues. We have a strong history of activism and organizing and it is in this vein that we have chosen this space to highlight the various ways we have attempted to carve out a niche in the online world. We shall not be silenced, and our dreams shall be realized. We are women of quality and worth.

Thanks, Renee!

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SPEAK! Album

From Sudy

Speak! is a women of color led media collective and in the summer months of 2008, they created a CD compilation of spoken word, poetry, and song. This is the first self-named album.

With womyn contributors from all over the country, Speak! is a testament of struggle, hope, and love. Many of the contributors are in the Radical Women of Color blogosphere and will be familiar names to you. Instead of just reading their work, you’ll be able to hear their voices.

I can guarantee you will have the same reaction as to when I heard them speak, I was mesmerized.

Proceeds of this album will go toward funding mothers and/or financially restricted activists wanting to attend the Allied Media Conference in Detroit, MI this July. This is our own grassroots organizing at its finest with financial assistance from the AMC. We collaborated and conference called for months and here it is, ready for your purchasing.

In addition to these moving testaments, there will be a zine, featuring more of our work and a curriculum available to further process the meaning of each piece for yourself, education, or a group discussion. The possibilities are endless.

You get all of this for less than $20, you can order one for yourself or buy a gift card for friend which can be redeemed to buy the CD. Stay on your toes and look for more information come January 1, 2009. Only 200 copies are available.

Forward this promo vid widely and to the ends of your contact list. See the link here.

Much love.

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I participated in this last year and plan to do so again this year.

In October 2007 people all over the United States gathered physically and in spirit to speak out against violence against women of color. Some of us wore red all day and explained that we were reclaiming and reframing our bodies as a challenge to the widespread acceptance of violence against women of color. Some of us wrote powerful essays about why we were wearing red and posted them on the internet. Some of us gathered with bold and like-minded folks and took pictures, shared poetry and expressed solidarity.

This year, on the first anniversary of the Be Bold Be Red Campaign, we invite you to make your bold stance against the violence enacted on women and girls of color in our society visible. In D.C., Chicago, Durham, Atlanta and Detroit women of color will be gathering to renew our commitment to creating a world free from racialized and gendered violence, and this time, we’ll be using a new technology called CyberQuilting to connect all of these gatherings in real time. To learn more about CyberQuilting, which is a women of color led project to stitch movements together using new web technologies and old traditions of love and nurturing, visit www.cyberquilt.wordpress.com.

Join in – read more here.

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I am finally getting around to reading Andrea Smith’s Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide.

Upon reading the introduction, by former 2000 candidate for Vice President (with Ralph Nadar) Winona LaDuke, I was struck by this paragraph:

As a Native woman, you can always count on someone “little ladying” you, or treating you as a novelty. When I ran for the office of the Vice President of the United States as Ralph Nadar’s running mate in 2000, The New York Times referred to me as something like “an Indian Activist from a reservation in Minnesota, who butchers deer and beaver on her kitchen table…. and has stated that the US is in violation of international law.” The New York Times would not refer to me in the same context as my opponents, as for instance, a “Harvard educated economist and author.”

What a difference 8 years makes. Or, what a difference a race makes. I’m interested in the difference in framing between the current female VP candidate and LaDuke. One is a radical, possibly anti-American activist who butchers her own meat…. and the other is a folksy, down-homey all American femme fatale who… butchers her own meat. One candidate is clearly framed as “the other,” while one is clearly framed as “one of us,” – Joe Six-Pack, if you will. Of course, “one of us” is a pretty specific demographic. In this Salon interview in July, 2000 LaDuke speaks to the framing.

I am not advocating for any female (or for that matter, any human) candidate to be judged upon their looks. The extra attention/scrutiny that Palin now, or Clinton during the primary season, received based upon their clothing, hair and makeup choices are absurd. The focus should be on nothing other than suitability for the positions being. This is what LaDuke was asking for – to be referred to in the same context as her opponents – relevant qualifications for the job. Yet in her case, her ethnicity and some of her actions were lifted up in a way that seems to intend to place her outside the “norm” for American citizenry. In the era of Sarah Palin, the same kind of activity is framed in such a way that somehow makes her even more the girl next door.

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More on beauty….

joankelly6000 linked to this, which is amazing and wonderful, and made me remember this:

The conversation continues.

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bfp has posted a talking points response to John LaBruzzo’s racist, misogynist suggestion to end poverty by sterilizing poor women.  The response is from the Women’s Health & Justice Initiative and the New Orleans Women’s Health Clinic.  

I’ll post a couple of paragraphs but you should really go read the entire document.

The sterilization policy currently being advocated by Representative LaBruzzo is a blatant form of reproductive violence and population control policies of blame and disenfranchisement, rooted in this country’s long and continual history of eugenics. The legislation and criminalization of black and poor women’s bodies, sexuality, fertility, and motherhood are being used as regulatory tools for economic and ideological justification for eugenics. If Mr. LaBruzzo is really concerned about ending poverty and reducing social burdens on the state, he would not be advocating punitive social polices that restrict women’s reproductive autonomy, but instead would be focusing his attention on ending corporate welfare and holding the corporate giants of Wall Street accountable for the disastrous state of the country’s economy.

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According to LaBruzzo, the solution to ending poverty in our society is to control and regulate the fertility and sexuality of black women – not the creation of comprehensive programs to improve health care access, our education system, housing affordability, and employment opportunities in the state. His plan pathologizes the reproductive capabilities of Black and poor women by proposing legislation to exploit the economic vulnerability of those who are socially stereotyped as burdens on the state.

***

The low-income women of color LaBruzzo feels so comfortable scapegoating for Louisiana’s economic conditions are those who support Louisiana’s economy by doing its low-wage work. When LaBruzzo goes to his office, these women clean it; when he goes to a restaurant, they wash the dishes; and when he stays at a hotel, they turn down his sheets. Rather than this mean-spirited attack, he should call for an increase in the minimum wage that would make it feasible for poor women to survive economically.

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